No thanks, I’ll watch it later

The marketing world is latching on to the likes of Periscope and Meerkat as the “next big thing,” They are, but not in the way that you think.

This is what I saw when I opened up Periscope this morning.

This is what I saw when I opened up Periscope this morning.

If you don’t know, Periscope and Meerkat are apps where users can live stream video directly from their mobile device. Like any good social medium, it’s interactive. Viewers can ask questions and make comments while the video is live.

Wired’s David Pierce describes it as “consensual voyeurism.” That’s not far off the mark though, to be fair, that’s not far off the mark for most social media. In a world of time-shifting on-demand viewing, watching something live seems quaint and old-fashioned. Some things are suited to live viewing, like sports, awards shows, or the last episode of the Sopranos. For the most part, live programming isn’t the future.

Until you add interactivity. This interactivity is the selling point for Periscope and Meerkat. Unfortunately, it’s not enough to build a sustainable and sizable community. Instagram did it with photos, but photos are much different. You can breeze through scores of photos with the flick of a finger. Videos take time to watch. Continue reading